ALMIRENA - RINALDO - PITTSBURGH OPERA

“Shannon Kessler Dooley offered a compelling portrait of Almirena.”
- Mark Kanny, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

“Ms. Dooley delivered the opera's signature aria, "Lascia ch'io pianga" with a tone drenched in sadness and longing.” - Andrew Druckenbrod, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette  


FRASQUITA - CARMEN - PITTSBURGH OPERA

“The remaining principals were resident artists, all adequate, with Shannon Kessler Dooley standing out for some gleaming high notes in the big ensemble climaxes.”
- Robert Croan, Opera News

“Katherine Drago (Mercedes) and Shannon Kessler Dooley (Frasquita) played Carmen's confidants with swagger and attractive timbre of their own.” 
- Andrew Druckenbrod, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


LUCIA - RAPE OF LUCRETIA - PITTSBURGH OPERA

“Katherine Drago as Bianca and Shannon Kessler Dooley as Lucia — provided deft characterizations and sturdy sound.”
Robert Croan, Opera News
 
“Lucretia's attendants -- the old nurse Bianca (Katherine Drago) and the flighty young Lucia (Shannon Kessler Dooley) -- are each characterized with conviction and solid sound.”
Robert Croan, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

“Shannon Kessler Dooley made the most of Britten's ornamental writing as Lucia.”
 - Mark Kanny, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


NANNETTA - FALSTAFF - PITTSBURGH OPERA

“Shannon Kessler Dooley's Nannetta was wonderfully fawning.”
Andrew Druckenbrod, Opera News 

“Shannon Kessler Dooley was an appropriately fawning and alluring Nannetta, portraying her with a light and airy treatment.”
- Andrew Druckenbrod, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


RISING STARS CONCERT - PITTSBURGH OPERA

“Shannon Kessler Dooley took over the stratosphere with silvery high notes punctuating the presentation of the rose from Strauss’s “Der Rosenkavalier.”
Robert Croan, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


SOLVEIG - PEER GYNT - UTAH SYMPHONY

“Soprano Shannon Kessler (Dooley), as Solveig, Peer Gynt's long-suffering love interest, gave a compelling performance. She brought lyricism and expressiveness to her arias. Of note was "Solveig's Song" and "Solveig's Cradle Song," both of which she sang with poignancy.” 
- Edward Reichel, Deseret Morning News


CLORINDA - LA CENERENTOLA - UTAH OPERA

“Soprano Shannon Kessler (Dooley) and mezzo Erica Brookhyser were hilarious as the abusive stepsisters, Clorinda and Tisbe, from their opening calisthenics to their battle for the faux prince’s attention.” - Catherine Reese Newton, The Salt Lake Tribune

“As with all versions of “Cinderella” the stepsisters, played here by Shannon Kessler (Dooley) and Erica Brookhyser, were there for comic relief.  They strutted around like peacocks and bumbled like pros, but they did it with a nice subtlety that enhanced rather than distracted from the rest of the performers.” - Jessica Harrison, Deseret Morning News


ZERLINA - DON GIOVANNI - UTAH OPERA

“...the volatile relationship between newlywed peasants Zerlina (soprano Shannon Kessler (Dooley)) and Masetto (baritone Chad Sloan) was shown to be healthier than any of Don Giovanni's attachments...  Kessler (Dooley) was a spunky, if worldly, Zerlina.”
- Catherine Reese Newton, The Salt Lake Tribune


NARCISSA - PHILEMON & BAUCIS - SPOLETO FESTIVAL USA

“Shannon Kessler Dooley (Narcissa, the daughter-in-law) offered a good sense of the most florid of the vocal parts.” - Heidi Waleson, The Wall Street Journal


Sister Constance - Dialogues of the Carmelites - Pittsburgh Opera

“Her (Amanda Majeski) lyric sound was complemented by the chirpy soprano of Shannon Kessler Dooley's Sister Constance, who brightened the early scenes with the novice nun's playfulness.” Robert Croan, Opera News

“Shannon Kessler Dooley sang with beautiful and unforced energy. She literally bounced around in her first scene.”  Mark Kanny, Pittsburgh Tribune -Review

“Shannon Kessler Dooley lent a sprightly bounce to Sister Constance (the closest thing to comic relief in this tragic affair).” Andrew Druckenbrod, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 



Marzelline - Fidelio - Utah Opera

“Shannon Kessler Dooley and Peter Tantsits brought unexpected charm and depth to the often-thankless roles of Marzelline, the jailer’s daughter who doesn’t realize the object of her affection is actually a woman, and Jaquino, Marzelline’s determined suitor.”
Catherine Reese Newton, The Salt Lake Tribune


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